Major decline in illegal logging

Jul 15th, 2010 | By John Waller | Category: Top Story
Illegal logging can remove vital wildlife habitat, leading to conflict with people

Illegal logging can remove vital wildlife habitat, leading to conflict with people

Illegal logging in the world’s forests has fallen by nearly a quarter since 2002, according to the most thorough analysis yet.

The London-based thinktank Chatham House says consumer pressure, legal restrictions by importing countries and media attention have all contributed.

Some important forest countries such as Brazil, Cameroon and Indonesia have seen much larger cuts, its report says.

But further improvements will be harder to make, it concludes.

The biggest documented falls in illegal timber production have been in Brazil, Cameroon and Indonesia, three of the world’s most heavily forested countries.

Indonesia has seen a drop of 75% in a decade. Cameroon’s figure is 50%, and Brazil is between the two.

Globally, the figure is 22% since 2002.

Sam Lawson, the report‘s lead author, made plain that illegal logging remains a major problem despite these impressive gains.

“That (50-75%) sounds like a lot; but bear in mind that illegal logging was such a bad problem in those countries that even though it’s reduced susbtantially, it still is a bad problem.

Read the rest of the story at: BBC News – Major decline seen in illegal logging By Richard Black Environment correspondent, BBC News

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